Switching to Full Frame: What to buy?

Freek Barten

New time-lapser
#1
Hey all,

The moment for me has come that I want to buy my first Full Frame camera. Only, as with a lot of things, what should I buy? Canon or Nikon or something else? I've been attracted to a Nikon D610, but maybe there's something better?

I currently have a Canon 600D with a EF-S 15-85mm which I mainly use for making timelapses. I'm beginning feel that the somewhat lack of quality and sharpness is getting to me. Because I have an EF-S lens, it doesn't matter if it's a Canon or a Nikon. I have to buy a new lens either way.

So, for a budget around €2000, which Full Frame camera + lens should I buy?

Thanks in advance! :)
 

Oliver

Active time-lapser
#2
Brand new Full frame + lens is going to be hard to achieve with eur2000. Your only options are the Canon 6D and Nikon D610 with a standard zoom lens but don't forget that low to medium range lenses will severely limits the final image quality. There is no point in buying a nice full frame camera with poor optic. Full frame sensors are not forgiving.

The main question is about the system you want to be in. Nikon, Canon or Sony ? As soon as you start investing money on lenses, it will be hard to change later on.

This topic leads to endless and heated debates but here is my personal opinion after trying the main brands:
- Canon: reliable, best selection of lenses, sensors falls behind the competition especially on the Dynamic Range department
- Nikon: reliable, good selection of lenses, great sensor with impressive DR (sony's sensor)
- Sony: impressive rate of innovation, best sensors (DR, resolution and ISO), not as reliable as Canon and Nikon, poor selection of lenses, poor battery life, expensive

To answer your question I would say:
Canon 6D + EF24-105 f4 or EF24-70 f4 or EF 17-40 f4. If you really need to stay low cost check the Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 STM but the sharpness will take a hit. Also consider an assortment of entry level prime such at 50mm f1.8, 40mm f2.8, 85mm f1.8, Samyang 14mm f2.8.

Nikon as similar type of lenses but for the body, the D750 is an amazing camera. The best in this range with incredible DR.

Sony are much more expensive, entry level APS-C are very good but battery life is horrible which is a problem for timelapse...
 

Freek Barten

New time-lapser
#3
Brand new Full frame + lens is going to be hard to achieve with eur2000. Your only options are the Canon 6D and Nikon D610 with a standard zoom lens but don't forget that low to medium range lenses will severely limits the final image quality. There is no point in buying a nice full frame camera with poor optic. Full frame sensors are not forgiving.

The main question is about the system you want to be in. Nikon, Canon or Sony ? As soon as you start investing money on lenses, it will be hard to change later on.

This topic leads to endless and heated debates but here is my personal opinion after trying the main brands:
- Canon: reliable, best selection of lenses, sensors falls behind the competition especially on the Dynamic Range department
- Nikon: reliable, good selection of lenses, great sensor with impressive DR (sony's sensor)
- Sony: impressive rate of innovation, best sensors (DR, resolution and ISO), not as reliable as Canon and Nikon, poor selection of lenses, poor battery life, expensive

To answer your question I would say:
Canon 6D + EF24-105 f4 or EF24-70 f4 or EF 17-40 f4. If you really need to stay low cost check the Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 STM but the sharpness will take a hit. Also consider an assortment of entry level prime such at 50mm f1.8, 40mm f2.8, 85mm f1.8, Samyang 14mm f2.8.

Nikon as similar type of lenses but for the body, the D750 is an amazing camera. The best in this range with incredible DR.

Sony are much more expensive, entry level APS-C are very good but battery life is horrible which is a problem for timelapse...
Hey Oliver,

€2000 is going to hard indeed, you're absolutely right. If I spend another extra €500, it would bring me closer to better glass. At this point, any Full Frame is a major upgrade from my 600D.

Thank you so much for reply, it helped me sort things out and I'm going to look in the combinations you suggested! :)
 

teemlapse

New time-lapser
#5
Have you considered just getting a few sharp primes instead? With your budget, I'd prioritize high quality glass over a larger sensor, if you can't have both.

Reason I say this is because my 4/3 sensor Olympus could take very sharp photos paired with good lenses, I only upgraded to FF so that I could use higher ISOs and cropping, but for timelapses it doesn't make much of a difference unless it's a scene that you want to dramatically zoom into, or star trails. Lenses make a much bigger difference IMO.
 

Freek Barten

New time-lapser
#6
Have you considered just getting a few sharp primes instead? With your budget, I'd prioritize high quality glass over a larger sensor, if you can't have both.

Reason I say this is because my 4/3 sensor Olympus could take very sharp photos paired with good lenses, I only upgraded to FF so that I could use higher ISOs and cropping, but for timelapses it doesn't make much of a difference unless it's a scene that you want to dramatically zoom into, or star trails. Lenses make a much bigger difference IMO.
I'm strongly considering it, reading all the advice. Would my 600D still be good enough if I, for example, buy a amazing EF prime lens?
 

Oliver

Active time-lapser
#7
Good enough for what ?

The final quality image quality depends of:
- Camera
- Lens
- Post production (photo editing, grading, final video edit)

Of course a new FF camera will be much better in any category than an old crop 600D but the body is only one part of the equation. Post-production can vastly improve your images. Do you master lightroom ? Apply correct sharpness, noise reduction and color grading already ?

Now if you decide to invest in lenses for your 600D, be careful between the different lens line-up. If you start buying EF-S lenses for crop sensor, you won't be able to fit these EF-S lenses later on a FF camera like a the 6D. However EF lenses can fit both crop and FF. Just keep that in mind if to plan for a future upgrade and thus, staying with Canon because once you start investing in lenses, you are stuck with a brand.

I don't know your level of timelapse but you currently have enough gears to work with. If anything, spend $80 to buy a strong ND filter for daylight timelapse. I would start making with what you have, learn the posd-prod tool and try to do a full video project.

Btw, this guy made this timelapse with an old 16mpx $400 nikon camera (D7000) and entry level zoom lens.
 

Freek Barten

New time-lapser
#8
Good enough for what ?

The final quality image quality depends of:
- Camera
- Lens
- Post production (photo editing, grading, final video edit)

Of course a new FF camera will be much better in any category than an old crop 600D but the body is only one part of the equation. Post-production can vastly improve your images. Do you master lightroom ? Apply correct sharpness, noise reduction and color grading already ?

Now if you decide to invest in lenses for your 600D, be careful between the different lens line-up. If you start buying EF-S lenses for crop sensor, you won't be able to fit these EF-S lenses later on a FF camera like a the 6D. However EF lenses can fit both crop and FF. Just keep that in mind if to plan for a future upgrade and thus, staying with Canon because once you start investing in lenses, you are stuck with a brand.

I don't know your level of timelapse but you currently have enough gears to work with. If anything, spend $80 to buy a strong ND filter for daylight timelapse. I would start making with what you have, learn the posd-prod tool and try to do a full video project.

Btw, this guy made this timelapse with an old 16mpx $400 nikon camera (D7000) and entry level zoom lens.
Hey Oliver,

Thanks again for your comment. I can say I'm quite capable with postproduction tools and have all the necessities for making timelapses.

Like suggested earlier, I think for now the first logical step is to buy good glass.
 

Oliver

Active time-lapser
#9
Sounds good. Good lenses are very important. Just be careful with the EF-S and EF distinction with canon. EF lenses can go on crop AND full frame camera while EF-S are only for crop/APS-C sensors. If you want to upgrade to full frame later you should buy EF lenses. However it will be harder to obtain wide angle with EF lenses on APS-C camera due to the x1.6 crop.
 

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